Archives For YouTube

Let’s play a game. This game is called, “Spot the Legible Title.”

Here are the choices – you’ll probably want to remember them for later.

TITLE #1 | CAPACITOR EXPERIMENT EPIC FAIL

Title B: Epic Fail Video -- Funny Fail Compilation

Title #2 | Epic Fail Video — Funny Fail Compilation May 2014

Title C: epic fails of history #1

title #3 | epic fails of history #1

Despite the relative newness of online video and online video optimization, this game has been around for a while. From 17th-century book binders to modern-day web designers, the art of legibility has been passed down to each new generation of typographic engineers and enjoyed by everyday folk like you and me (who have little clue that they are being visually manipulated into rapid word comprehension).

What is legibility, exactly? In a nutshell, “legibility” is the quality of being clear enough to read.

Seems simple enough.

Presumably, if you can read English that should mean you can read English words in any typeface. In any letter case. With any stylistic modifications.

Right?

Okay, now try deciphering the names of all the roads that cross “Thames Street” on this 1736 map of London.

Well…maybe not.

Despite this map being written in Modern English (the kind we still read and write in) and using words familiar to most English speakers, the street names are hard to riddle out. Not impossible, of course – just more time-consuming than would be ideal for, say, catching the attention of a YouTube viewer.

Now, you may be thinking, “Come on, vidIQ blog. Obviously, no one is going to be writing YouTube video titles in Teutonic No.1 font with a 45-degree tilt on a #F7E2D1 hexadecimal background. That would be madness (especially since everyone knows YouTube uses Alternate Gothic No. 2 – jeez).”

If only it were that simple, dear reader. Because legibility isn’t just about font – it’s about LeTt3R Ca$iNg too.

For example, PowerPoint has all your letter casing needs covered.

For example, PowerPoint has all your letter casing needs covered.

Letter casing is legibility’s dirty little secret – while web designers try, retry, re-retry, and then meticulously align different fonts against their elegantly engineered landing pages, the real fight for reading comprehension is in the Social Media trenches. With preordained sans-serif letters flung across the World Wide Web in Facebook feeds, on Pinterest boards, and – yes – even on YouTube Watch Pages, user attention spans are shortening while legibility efforts are dwindling.

You see, unless text is completely legible, it takes longer to read. 

How much longer? A fraction of a second, maybe, for each imperfectly-legible letter. But second fragments, as any internet professional knows, are critical when potential consumers are scanning web pages, feeds, and search results. So, if you’re invested in your content’s text being quickly understood (or, really, being not simply ignored), it helps to type legibly.

To understand the effect of shrewdly-chosen letter casing, consider this…

long text strings that are written in lower case letters evoke a softness and nonchalance that is brutally absent when sentences, headlines, or paragraphs are written in all caps. alas, this softly sloped and undemanding case type is not ideal for rapid-scan readers hunting through dozens of videos. it turns out that, when reading titles or headlines, it takes a moment to visually adjust to words being so demurely typed.

AND, IN ADDITION TO CAUSING YOU SOMETHING OF A HEADACHE, TEXT SET IN ALL CAPS IS THE LEAST LEGIBLE BECAUSE HUMAN EYES RECOGNIZE WORDS BY BOTH THEIR SHAPE AND THEIR INCLUDED LETTERS. TYPING IN ALL CAPITAL LETTERS ENSURES THAT EACH WORD HAS THE SAME SHAPE AND, THEREFORE, TAKES LONGER TO READ.

Finally, we have the eponymous Title Case: Human Language’s Gold Standard for Titles and Headlines.

User-anticipated and legible, title casing makes title-scanning a breeze. And while search rank is unaffected by a video title’s letter casing, you can be darn sure that Optimizing a Video Title for Human Eyes will affect viewer click-thru rates and reader comprehension.

Now that you have some typographical context, are you ready to play, “Spot the [Most] Legible Title”? You remember the choices:

TITLE #1 | CAPACITOR EXPERIMENT EPIC FAIL

Title #2 | Epic Fail Video — Funny Fail Compilation May 2014

title #3 | epic fails of history #1

So, my dear and clever and admirably patient reader, which title do you find most legible? And, which title would you click?

Feel free to leave answers in the comments or to address them in a strongly-cased letter to contact@vidiq.com.


Concerned that artful title casing is an incomplete video optimization strategy? Access more of the metrics that matter, right on the YouTube Watch Page, with vidIQ’s free Chrome Extension.

With video marketing moving at the speed of light, it’s easy to get wild-eyed about your workflow.

The general wisdom is to produce, produce, produce – which is the YouTube marketing equivalent of the fool’s adage, “Any decision is better than no decision.”

But content, and its consumers, have been around for a long time. And the thread that connects them has always been simpler than strategy, more powerful than promotion, and greater than hype.

At vidIQ, YouTube and YouTube marketing is our business – so we get it. It seems necessary to surrender to the daily scramble to produce, produce, produce on your channel. It’s easy to lose sight of the real goals of video marketing, to get lost in the endless lists of “YouTube Tips and Tricks” and to worship the newly-deified metrics of “Subscribers” and “Total Views.”

Instead, sit back for a moment – just one moment in this hypnotically hectic world of newsfeeds – to consider the wisdom of great creators who have come before you.

It’s more comforting than cat pictures, I promise.


1. “Every action needs to be prompted by a motive.” – Leonardo da Vinci

You must make content with a purpose.

We can help.


2. “Of all our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language.” – Walt Disney

It’s not enough to communicate, video marketing can make you understood.

We can help.


3. “Wherever you go, go with all your heart.” – Confucius

Commitment to your content and campaigns is integral to success.

We can help.


4. “Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.” – Aristotle

Do only what you enjoy, if you want to do it well.

We can help.


5. “Time you enjoy wasting, was not wasted.” – John Lennon

Don’t waste time on pursuits you don’t enjoy.

We can help.


6. “Information is not knowledge.” – Albert Einstein

5. Einstein - Info Not Knowledge

Quote Credit: BrainyQuote
Original Photo Credit: Marius B

Data without direction is trivial.

We can help.


7. “A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.” – William Shakespeare

You don’t know everything, and that’s okay.

We can help.


8. “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” – Helen Keller

It takes a village to succeed in content.

We can help.


The last 20 years, and the mass adoption of the internet, have created the illusion that human beings can build complete digital worlds, will new markets into existence, and create content for viral consumption, all at once and all by themselves. But, as with all human endeavor, we stand on the shoulders of giants.

Moreover, we stand together.

Look to the history of marketing – or, heck, just the history of history – and you’ll find an unbroken chain of collaboration, experimentation, and creation.

At vidIQ, we know YouTube and we know you know content.

Maybe we should create something together?

Click here to request a demo of our YouTube marketing software.

Or, click here to download our free Chrome extension.


See this blog as a presentation by checking us out on SlideShare. Followers welcome!

Creator Suggested is a new metric we’ve been running in our Chrome Extension for the last couple of months. It’s a surprisingly powerful new metric that monitors the amount of videos YouTube is recommending back to a publisher’s own channel, and while that may not sound like much, it says a ton about your channel’s success.

Budweiser_Super_Bowl_XLVIII_Commercial_--__Puppy_Love__-_YouTube-2

In the Budweiser Super Bowl Puppy Love video, we’re tracking a rating of 4/20, meaning 4 of the 20 videos YouTube is recommending after the video and on the sidebar are also on the Budweiser channel.

It’s not as glamorous as some other metrics, but this has huge implications for channel (and thus brand) engagement. Think about it: someone loved your video and watched it to the end, but then what? Either they hit the search bar to find something similar (which is probably going to be on someone else’s channel), or they’re so engaged they can’t help but click to watch another in the recommendations. The more of those videos that are on your channel, the higher the total views your channel will receive when those videos explode, and the better your brand sticks with each viewer.

Breaking Down the Score

4/20: This is the lowest Creator Suggested rating a channel can have and a sign the channel isn’t focused enough on playlists, proper metadata, and annotations.

6/20 – 10/20: You’re on your way! We’ve seen great channels averaging around here, like The Verge and American Express.

12/20 – 16/20: If you’re here, you’re killing it. This channel is likely in the ranks of Red BullBuzzfeed, and Old Spice.

20/20:  At this point, you’ve likely been “whitelisted” by YouTube. We’ve seen some huge non-profits, political parties, and brands spending a significant amount on YouTube to get here. ARDrone, Nintendo, and The Olympics are great examples.

An Example of Creator Suggested at Work

As of writing this, we are seeing the University of Minnesota have a very viral moment with Guy Pulls Out Sign on Gophers Kiss Cam. They worked to get a 19/20 on Creator Suggested, and that will pay off as this video drives a massive amount of views and increased watch time throughout their YouTube channel. That’s more watches, shares, and engagement with their canon of videos, leading to exponentially more total views as people continue flocking to them.

If you take a second to look through the channel, you can see they didn’t get here by luck, or even a huge budget. They just consistently upload content, grow their subscribers, annotate, and actively playlist content.

There’s no secret to success like this, just sound YouTube marketing practice. And sound practice starts with the right data to build it on, which can all be yours with the vidIQ Chrome Extension.

Don’t have the vidIQ Chrome Extension? Make sure to download it here.

Want more insights on your own channel? Signup for our full video marketing suite.

October has been a big month for a much-unloved fixture of air travel – the dreaded FAA mandated airline safety lesson that precedes every takeoff. Alas, no matter how many times you’ve learned how to buckle your seatbelt and return your seat back to its full upright position, you’re still obligated to re-learn every time you fly. Luckily some clever aviation brands have taken it upon themselves to relieve their passengers of their woe by snazzing up their videos and unleashing them on the YouTube masses – and they’re really popular.

In the last three weeks alone four airline pre-screening videos accrued 4.7 million YouTube views – the most popular of which, a collaboration between Disney and KLM, nearly topped the vidIQ/Adweek Top 10 YouTube Brand Videos chart last week. These brands are leveraging collaborations and influencers in extraordinary ways in order to drive earned media and build brand equity – all things we’re very fond of here at vidIQ. Watch the videos below, check out their stats, and discover what they’re doing right or wrong.

chart

Air New Zealand’s “Betty White — Safety Old School Style #airnzsafetyvideo”

Betty White’s collaboration with ANZ solidifies this air safety video as an instant classic.

ANZ

Pros:

  • Great number of shares on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Well tagged!
  • Solid, engaging description.
  • Includes an end-card and annotations promoting other content.

Cons:

  • End-card/annotations could be more engaging.
  • No brand engagement with their commenters (proven to improve views by 4X).
  • Could be promoting more links in description.

KLM’s “Disney’s Planes: spectacular pre-screening on board of a KLM plane”

While it’s not a safety video per se, KLM’s pre-screening collaboration with Disney builds awareness for Pixar’s forthcoming “Planes.”

KLM

Pros:

  • Above average Watch Time.
  • Great number of shares on Facebook, Twitter.
  • Well tagged!
  • Good description length.

Cons:

  • No end-card promoting other videos/a CTA!
  • No links in description.
  • No brand engagement with their commenters (proven to improve views by 4X).

Virgin America’s “Safety Video #VXsafetydance”

Virgin proves everything is better with a robot-dance ensemble wearing flotation devices.

Virgin

Pros:

  • Great number of shares on Facebook, Twitter.
  • Well tagged!
  • Solid, engaging description.

Cons:

  • No end-card promoting other videos/a CTA!
  • No brand engagement with their commenters (proven to improve views by 4X).
  • Could be promoting more links in description.

Delta’s “Holiday In-Flight Safety Video”

Delta proves it’s never too early to start advertising Christmas with a creepy human-sized nutcracker.

Delta

Pros:

  • Above average Watch Time.

Cons:

  • No tags! Huge loss of organic traffic because of this.
  • No description! How is your viewer supposed to know what action they should take next?
  • No end-card promoting other videos/a CTA!
  • No brand engagement with their commenters (proven to improve views by 4X).
  • Could be promoting more links in description.

Know any other great airline industry video examples? Let us know in the comments!